STDs List and Symptoms of STDs

Posted on Jul 24 2017 - 6:23am by Afroz

STDs List & Symptoms of STDs

(STDs)Sexually transmitted diseases and Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are not something any of us like to think about but it has become more important than ever to get yourself checked, especially if you are pregnant. These viruses can affect babies skin, eyes, mouth, joints, blood, central nervous system, and can even lead to their death.

STIs

In simple terms, an STI means an infection has been contracted, but it is not yet a disease. Some sexually transmitted viruses do not have symptoms but a person can carry the virus. As soon as that virus shows a symptom it will be a disease, or an STD, which is far more serious.

Below are the most common STDs and STIs, their symptoms and the treatments.

Genital Herpes

  • Sores around the vaginal region, the vulva, the cervix, and the rectum.
  • Herpes can also appear on the mouth particularly on the lips.
  • It is highly contagious.
  • During childbirth, the baby is at high risk of infection, especially if there is herpes in the birthing canal.
  • If the baby contracts the virus, it can affect the skin, eyes, mouth, central nervous system, and spread to internal organs causing Disseminated diseases.
  • Disseminated diseases that can occur include Hepatitis, Pneumonitis, Disseminated intravascular coagulation, and skin disease.
  • To protect the baby, doctors will perform a C-section and mothers will have to go onto antiviral medication during pregnancy.

HPV(Human Papillomavirus) Genital Warts

  • These look like small skin colored, or red growths around genitals. Sometimes in clusters or on their own.
  • Symptoms might only appear within three months.
  • They can appear in or outside of the vagina and cervix, the anus, the penis head or shaft and scrotum.
  • They can also appear in the mouth or throat.
  • The virus can cause cervical, rectal, vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancer.
  • Some warts can grow because of pregnancy hormones and if they obstruct the birthing canal the baby would have to be delivered by C-Section.
  • There is no treatment that can kill the HPV virus that causes genital warts. You can have a doctor remove warts with laser therapy, freezing them or by surgery if they are very big.
  • Treatment will be delayed if you are pregnant.
  • You can wear cotton underwear and keep the area dry to try and aid the situation.
  • It is very rare for the baby to be infected by the virus but there are cases.

Gonorrhea

  • Gonorrhea can grow in the cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes and in the urethra. The mouth, throat, and anus are also common.
  • It is usually not obvious that you have Gonorrhea but sometimes symptoms involve:
    • painful urination
    • Greenish-yellow or white vaginal discharge
    • Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
    • Spotting after sex
    • Swelling of the vulva or testicles
    • A burning throat and swollen glands (oral sex)
    • Fever
    • Vomiting
    • Stomach pain.
  • Untreated Gonorrhea can cause miscarriages or stillbirths.
  • Babies born to infected mothers could have eye infections causing blindness. Newborns are given medication at birth if this is a concern.
  • Blood and joint infections might also occur in babies and can be deadly.
  • Treatment involves an antibiotic which can be taken during pregnancy.

Chlamydia

  • No visible symptoms but it cause painful urination, unusual discharge, fever, pelvic pain and pain when having sex, vagina or penis opening is itchy, swollen testicles and nausea.
  • Untreated Chlamydia can cause miscarriages and premature births.
  • Babies born to infected mothers could have eye infections causing blindness. Newborns are given medication at birth if this is a concern.
  • Could also cause pneumonia in newborns.
  • Antibiotics are used to treat it and can be given to pregnant women.

Syphilis

  • Syphilis is often misdiagnosed as the flu, but can also appear as a sore on the vulva, vagina, cervix, anus or rectum.
  • Later symptoms include:
    • Rosy rash typically on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet
    • Moist warts between legs
    • White patches on the inside of the mouth
    • Swollen glands
    • Fever .
  • Syphilis can cause a miscarriage or a stillborn.
  • It is also easily transmitted to a fetus which is both serious and fatal.
  • It can be transmitted to the baby in the birth canal
  • Syphilis can be transferred to the baby through the placenta.
  • Infants who contract syphilis are often born prematurely and if left untreated,  babies could develop problems with their internal organs.
  • Treatment involves antibiotics which are safe during pregnancy and will help prevent it spreading to the baby and will help stop the infection progressing in the mother.
  • If syphilis is left untreated it will eventually result in death.

Hepatitis B

  • This is a virus that causes a liver infection.
  • flu-like symptoms, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice
  • It is spread in blood and other bodily fluids such as semen.
  • Newborns can develop liver disease from hepatitis B, which can result in death
  • There is no cure but if you catch it fast you can get vaccinations which might give you enough antibodies to fight it off.
  • Vaccinations are given to newborns of positive mothers with antibodies to protect them from infection.

HIV

  • Is an incurable virus that attacks and destroys the immune system.
  • Symptoms can be flu-like and eventually lead to death.
  • HIV can be contracted through sexual activity, blood transfusion or dirty needles.
  • The virus can be transmitted to the baby:
    • In the womb, there is a 25 percent chance of the baby being born HIV positive.
    • During birth, via contact with bodily fluids
    • Breastfeeding
  • Anti-retroviral drugs are given as treatment and help inhibit the virus. They are safe to use during pregnancy and can help prevent the baby being born HIV positive.
  • Anti-retrovirals are also given to newborns for 6 weeks after birth.
  • It is recommended to have a c section and not to breastfeed your baby if you are HIV positive.

Reff:

https://www.stdcheck.com/blog/std-and-sti-whats-the-difference/.

http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a544487/hiv-and-aids-in-pregnancy

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/conditions/sexual-health/a2250/sexually-transmitted-diseases/

 

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